Keynotes

Keynote talk 1

Prof. Woontack Woo

Prof. Woontack Woo
(Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology)

Augmented Reality & DigiLog: Toward Ubiquitous Virtual Reality 2.0

abstract:
In this talk, I will introduce a new concept of “ubiquitous Virtual
Reality (UVR)” in the view point of Metaverse and then explain how to realize Virtual Reality in physical space with context-aware Augmented Reality. In UVR-enabled space it is possible to personalize using user’s, as well as environmental, context and then selectively share the augmented object with additional (or 3D content as well as text) information according to user’s social relationships. I will also explain some core technologies developed in GIST U-VR Lab for last 5 years and demonstrate U-VR applications such as DigiLog Book, Digilog Miniature, CAMAR Tour, etc.

bio:
Prof. Woontack Woo received his BS in Electronics Engineering from Kyungpook National University in 1989 and his MS in Electronics and Electrical Engineering from Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH) in 1991. In 1998, he received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering-Systems from University of Southern California (USC), CA, USA. In 1999, as an invited Researcher, he joined Advanced Telecommunications Research (ATR), Kyoto, Japan. Since Feb. 2001, he has been with the Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), where he is a Professor in the Dept. of Information and Communications (DIC) and Director of Culture Technology Institute (CTI). The main
thrust of his research has been implementing ubiquitous virtual reality in smart space, which include Context-aware Augmented Reality, 3D Vision, HCI, and Culture Technology.

Keynote talk 2

Prof. Hiroshi Ishiguro

Prof. Hiroshi Ishiguro
(Osaka University and ATR)

Robots, Humans, and Media

abstract:
Studies on interactive robots and androids are not just in robotics but they are also closely coupled in cognitive science and neuroscience. It is a research area for investigating fundamental issues of interface and media technology. This talks introduce the series of androids developed in both Osaka University and ATR and propose a new information medium realized based on the studies.

bio:
Hiroshi Ishiguro (M’) received a D.Eng. in systems engineering from the Osaka University, Japan in 1991. He is currently Professor of Department of Systems Innovation in the Graduate School of Engineering Science at Osaka University (2009-) and Group Leader (2011-) of Hiroshi Ishiguro Laboratory at the Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute (ATR). His research interests include distributed sensor systems, interactive robotics, and android science. He has published more than 300 papers in major journals and conferences, such as Robotics Research and IEEE PAMI. On the other hand, he has developed many humanoids and androids, called Robovie, Repliee, Geminoid, Telenoid, and Elfoid. These robots have been reported many times by major media, such as Discovery channel, NHK, and BBC. He has also received the best humanoid award four times in RoboCup. In 2007, Synectics Survey of Contemporary Genius 2007 has selected him as one of the top 100 geniuses alive in the world today.

Keynote talk 3

This keynote talk is a part of the “Parasitic Humanoid (CREST, JST)” organized session.

Prof. Henry Fuchs

Prof. Henry Fuchs
(University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)

Toward Improved 3D Telepresence

abstract:
Telepresence dreams have been inspired for decades by science fiction holodecks, while teleconferencing developments have been inspired by dreams of much-reduced travel budgets and overcrowded classrooms.  Meanwhile however, even high-end commercial teleconferencing systems are a far cry from these dreams; they restrict participants to fixed seats, and they inhibit such simple activities as walking around and writing on white boards, and fail to support even simple eye contact with remote participants. This talk with focus on recent developments both in meeting-room based systems, as well as mobile units that allow the remote participant to travel to non-instrumented meeting rooms, to laboratories, factories, hospitals, and clinics. Recent progress in room-based systems include multi-viewer autostereo displays that provide each user with a distinct view, to give an illusion of a window into a remote 3D environment.  Recent progress in 3D acquisition of these remote environments include real-time acquisition and reconstruction based on multiple consumer-priced depth-plus-color cameras. To improve mobile telepresence,  our UNC team, lead by Professor Greg Welch, has been developing a mobile physical-virtual avatar with a life-size moving human mannequin which takes on the dynamic appearance and mimics the head pose of its remote human “inhabiter.”  The talk will conclude with speculation about the direction of future progress in these areas, toward systems appropriate for individual offices and homes.

bio:
Henry Fuchs (PhD, Utah 1975) is the Federico Gil Distinguished Professor of Computer Science and Adjunct Professor of Biomedical Engineering at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a fellow of the ACM. He is recipient of the 1992 ACM SIGGRAPH Achievement Award, the 1992 Academic Award of the National Computer Graphics Association, and the 1997 Satava Award of the Medicine Meets Virtual Reality Conference. Fuchs has been active in computer graphics since the 1970s, coauthoring over 170 publications on rendering algorithms (BSP Trees), real-time hardware (Pixel-Planes and PixelFlow), virtual environments, tele-immersion systems and medical applications. He is a member of the Steering Committee of the International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality (ISMAR), External Advisory Board of Harvard’s Neuroimage Analysis Center, Editorial Advisory Board of Computer & Graphics Journal, and the Editorial Advisory Board of International Journal of Virtual Reality.  He has also served as a member of the National Research Council’s Computer Science and Telecommunications Board and DARPA’s Information Science and Technology Study Group (ISAT). He is co-founder and Special Technical Advisor of InnerOptic Technology, Inc.

Keynote talk 4

This keynote talk is a part of the “Parasitic Humanoid (CREST, JST)” organized session.

Prof. Taro Maeda

Prof. Taro Maeda
(Osaka University)

Immersive tele-collaboration with Parasitic Humanoid: how to assist behavior directly in mutual telepresence

abstract:
Telexistence allows you to control a robot intuitively without the
need of learning by exploiting the complete physical association
between a controller and a robot. In this technology, sensory and
motor information based on robot’s and user’s embodiment is translated
to digital data, which could be recorded, transmitted to each other
and share their experiences. The technology can be available not only
to the interaction between a robot and a human but also between
humans. When we realize it, how to share their motions and sensations
of humans and how to adjust or revise their motions become important.
In this paper, we propose an approach for sharing first-person
perspectives and developed a view-sharing system to realize such
interaction using the Parasitic Humanoid (PH). PH is a wearable
robotic human interface for sampling, recording, and replaying the
sensory and behavioral experiences of the wearer from the first person
perspective. Connecting PH wearers can realize skill transmission,
telecollaboratoin, and sharing experiences between humans.

bio:
Taro Maeda (Ph.D., Engineering) was born in Osaka Japan, on February 3, 1965. He received the B.E. degrees from the University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, 1987. Until 1992, he had been a researcher of the Mechanical Engineering Laboratory, Ministry of International Trade and Industry, Tsukuba, Japan. Until 1997, he had been a staff researcher of the University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. Until 2002, he had been an assistant professor of the University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. Until 2007, he had been a senior research scientist, supervisor of NTT Communication Science Laboratories, Atsugi, Japan. Since 2007, he has been a professor of Osaka University, Osaka, Japan. His research interests include psychophysics, modeling of brain by neural networks, man-machine interface for tele-operation, and virtual reality. Since 2007, he has been a Research Director of research project, “Multi-sensory Communication, Sensing the Environment, and Behavioral Navigation with Networking of Parasitic Humanoids”, in CREST (Core Research for Evolutional Science & Technology) by JST.